What to look out for in food label and the common misleading information Abrandfood

What to look out for in food label and the common misleading information in food label

Food labels in packaged food consist of ingredients, expiry date, product name, descriptions, nutrition facts and some may include nutrition information.

What is Nutrition Facts?

Nutrition facts show the basic information of calories, fat, cholesterol, sodium, carbohydrates (dietary fibre, protein and some vital vitamins and minerals). Consumers will be able to get the transparent data on the nutrients of the food products and look into the daily nutrients in percentage in order to plan their nutrients intake accordingly.

 

 

What to look out for in food label?

 

 

Sugar content

Many of packaged food are loaded with too much sugar content but the sugar content is often neglected especially in tempting food and drinks such as chocolates and soda drinks.

For eg, Coca-cola has 42g of sugar content while a woman daily added sugar should not be more than 30g.

Sodium content

Many of packaged food are loaded with too much sodium content but the sodium content is often neglected especially in tempting food and drinks especially instant noodle.

For eg, Maggi instant noodle has 800-1400mg of sodium which is about 33-58% of our daily sodium intake!

Trans Fat

A mere 2.2g of trans fat a day will potentially clog the blood arteries. However, there are still handful of products in the market contain trans fat. Common example of trans fat found are biscuits, butter, cookies, fried food.

 

Misleading food label

Sugar Content

Many canned drinks tend to put half serving of the sugar content on the label to mislead consumer, making consumer feels less guilty looking at half of the sugar content in the food or drinks. For example, a 355ml beverage will list the sugar content as 39g for 240ml, therefore the actual sugar content should be 57.7g instead of the 39g.

 

Trans Fat

Products containing less than 5 g of fat show amounts rounded to the nearest 0.5 g. Amounts less than 0.5 g are rounded to 0 g. For example, if a product contains 0.45 g of trans fat per serving, and the package contains 18 servings, the label would show 0 g of trans fat, even though the product actually contains a total of 8.1 g of trans fat.

 

 

 

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